1. Media query/RWD/viewport survey results - QuirksBlog
    author » Peter-Paul Koch
    date » 2013-11-22

    abstract » This week I ran an eight-question survey of media query use, responsive web design fundamentals, and one viewport question. 1251 web developers reacted. This entry presents the results.
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    Last updated 2013-11-22
  2. @font-face for icons? Compatibility research
    author » @filamentgroup
    date » 2013-11-21

    abstract » Preliminary research on how many devices don't support @font-face and icon fonts. 370 million is a big number.
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    Last updated 2013-11-21
  3. Page Weight Matters
    author » Chris Zacharias
    date » 2012-12-21

    abstract » Through Feather, I learned a valuable lesson about the state of the Internet throughout the rest of the world. Many of us are fortunate to live in high bandwidth regions, but there are still large portions of the world that do not. By keeping your client side code small and lightweight, you can literally open your product up to new markets.
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    Last updated 2013-11-14
  4. Responsive Images usage survey - May 2013 - Google Drive
    author » @respimg
    date » 2013-05-20

    abstract » The results of our survey are in: authors prefer `picture` by a wide margin, and “art direction” is a big use case!
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    Last updated 2013-11-14
  5. India's mobile Internet :: The revolution has begun
    An overview of how mobile Internet is touching the lives of millions.

    author » Aashish Bhinde (aashish.bhinde@avendus.com), Karan Sharma (karan.sharma@avendus.com), Seema Rao (seema.rao@avendus.com), Kanchan Mishra (kanchan.mishra@avendus.com), Preetham N. (preetham.n@avendus.com), Nihir Nemani (nihir.nemani@avendus.com), Mahesh Jakhotia (mahesh.jakhotia@avendus.com)
    date » September 2013

    abstract » Given the far greater penetration of mobile phones globally (as compared to wireline broadband connections), mobile has been expected to emerge as the primary channel for accessing the Internet. If you apply this perspective to emerging countries like India, where wireline broadband connectivity is stuck in the middle ages, it appears fairly inevitable that mobile will become the primary access channel for a majority of Internet users.
    Despite its promise, several questions remain unanswered about how potential of this medium will unfold in India. Will companies be able to monetize their offerings? Does the medium afford itself to scale and development of large enterprises? Will Internet based businesses transition to mobile leaving little room for “mobile first” companies to compete? Will local start-ups be able to compete with global technology giants?
    This report is an attempt to collate as much secondary data we could gather from disparate sources and combine that with perspectives and insights lent by industry practitioners we spoke with. We've tried to follow a similar approach to our previous report by first taking a detailed look at enablers, bottlenecks and emerging solutions within the mobile Internet ecosystem. We've then tried to address the question that every skeptic of mobile Internet raises through an analysis of existing and potential monetization mechanisms in the segment. Finally, we have explored emerging business models and have showcased a few companies that have gained scale by focusing on mobile as a primary medium for generation and consumption of their service.
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    Last updated 2013-11-14
  6. Americans spend 58 minutes a day on their smartphones | Marketing Forward
    author » John Fetto/Experian Marketing Services
    date » 2013-05-28

    abstract » New data from Experian Marketing Services’ Simmons® ConnectSM mobile and digital panel sheds light on the way smartphone users spend time using their phone, with the average adult clocking 58 minutes daily on their device. On average, smartphone owners devote 26% of the time they spend on their phone talking and another 20% texting. Social networking eats up 16% of smartphone time while browsing the mobile web accounts for 14% of time spent. Emailing and playing games account for roughly 9% and 8% of daily smartphone time, respectively, while use of the phone’s camera and GPS each take up another 2% of our smartphone day.
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    Last updated 2013-11-14
  7. Why we need responsive images: part deux - TimKadlec.com
    author » Tim Kadlec
    date » 2013-11-11

    abstract » One thing to come out of this testing: we need better tools. From what I can tell, only Chrome and IE11 provide this information, and each of them has things to improve on here. IE11 and Chrome Mobile seem to lack any resize information. Chrome doesn’t attempt to link their decodes to the actual image (whereas in IE11, if you hover over a decode it tells you the url of the associated image). And whatever is causing the exponential growth in decode count on Chrome sure seems fishy.

    There’s also a great deal of follow-up that could be done here:

    How do other browsers handle image decoding and resizing?
    How do these results change as file weight is adjusted up or down (important for compressive images, for example)?
    Does file format impact decoding and resizing times?
    Those questions aside, it’s already apparent that serving large images to the browser has some potentially series side effects from a rendering perspective. On the test page with 6x images (not unusual at the moment on many responsive sites), the combination of resizes and decodes added an additional 278ms in Chrome and 95.17ms in IE (perhaps more if we had resize data) to the time it took to display those 10 images. That much time spent on decoding and resizing can not only delay rendering of images, but could impact battery life and scrolling behavior as well.

    While page weight and load time are the most commonly cited examples, those clearly aren’t the only metrics suffering when we serve images that are too large to the browser.
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    Last updated 2013-11-14
  8. Why we need responsive images - TimKadlec.com
    author » Tim Kadlec
    date » 2013-06-11

    abstract » We spend a lot of time talking about responsive images online—debating the approaches, trying out new solutions. Sometimes it can be a little discouraging that we still haven’t gotten it ironed out (I know I feel that way frequently).

    But the web needs us to be diligent. It needs us to not settle for seemingly simple solutions that sacrifice performance. It is extremely rare where one optimization lets us knock off such a significant amount of page weight, but here we are staring one such technique right in the face.

    72% less image weight.

    That’s why we need a responsive image solution.
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    Last updated 2013-11-14
  9. Twitter / jesseGlacken
    author » Jesse Glacken @jesseGlacken
    date » 2013-11-07

    content » .@wilto @jaffathecake @tkadlec I’m not. My quadriplegic cousin (C5 injury) can _only_ tap to zoom. Can move his hands, but not his fingers.
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    Last updated 2013-11-14
  10. Exploring the accessibility and appeal of surface computing for older adult health care support
    author » Piper, Anne Marie and Campbell, Ross and Hollan, James D.
    date » 2010-04-10

    altLink » http://hci.ucsd.edu/hollan/Pubs/pap0124-piper.pdf (non-paywall)

    abstract » This paper examines accessibility issues of surface computing with older adults and explores the appeal of surface computing for health care support. We present results from a study involving 20 older adults (age 60 to 88) performing gesture-based interactions on a multitouch surface. Older adults were able to successfully perform all actions on the surface computer, but some gestures that required two fingers (resize) and fine motor movement (rotate) were problematic. Ratings for ease of use and ease of performing each action as well as time required to figure out an action were similar to that of younger adults. Older adults reported that the surface computer was less intimidating, less frustrating, and less overwhelming than a traditional computer. The idea of using a surface computer for health care support was well-received by participants. We conclude with a discussion of design issues involving surface computing for older adults and use of this technology for health care.

    ACMRef » http://dl.acm.org/downformats.cfm?id=1753461&parent_id=1753326&expformat=acmref&CFID=378777354&CFTOKEN=42499277

    BibTeX » http://dl.acm.org/downformats.cfm?id=1753461&parent_id=1753326&expformat=bibtex&CFID=378777354&CFTOKEN=42499277

    EndNote » http://dl.acm.org/downformats.cfm?id=1753461&parent_id=1753326&expformat=endnotes&CFID=378777354&CFTOKEN=42499277